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Course Descriptions & Graduation Requirements

August 01, 2015

2016 Graduation Requirements (Click to see graduation requirements)

2017 AND UP GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS (Click to see graduation requirements)

Course Descriptions

Language Arts

 

Reading 7/8

This course offers explicit, systematic instruction in comprehension, vocabulary, fluency, and writing accelerates students toward reading proficiency.  Various strategies to improve vocabulary, reading fluency and writing skills will be practiced in this class in the form of written materials, online reading practice and hands-on activities.

 

7th Grade English

Students will gather ideas, organize their thinking and express themselves fluently in both spoken and written forms.  They will connect the ideas and language in literature with skills of composition and focused language and written practice by incorporating vocabulary, grammar and reading strategies.  

 

8th Grade English

 

Eighth Grade English students will build on the previous year’s content standards in reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.  Students will read a variety of literature and apply knowledge of literary techniques.  Students will study the six traits of writing with an emphasis on descriptive writing.  They will study grammar (the 8 parts of speech), punctuation skills, and sentence structure. 

                                                                            9th Grade English

Students will read and analyze classical literature, including short stories, myths, an epic poem, and drama, identifying literary techniques.  They will review grammar skills, concentrating on usage and punctuation, and will focus writing on narrative essays and the five-paragraph essay.

 

10th Grade English

Students will read, interpret, and analyze a variety of novels, autobiographies, and biographies.  They will apply analytical thinking skills and prior knowledge of literary note taking skills, organization skills, paraphrasing skills and writing skills in a research paper.

 

11th Grade English

Students will use the writing process to brainstorm, organize, create, peer-edit and revise their essays.  The focus will be on developing effective persuasive techniques, but will also develop understanding of the traits of effective writing in various situations.  Lessons in grammar, vocabulary, sentence fluency, and figurative language will help students develop their writing skills.  Students will read a variety of fiction and non-fiction, with emphasis comprehension and inferring skills.

  

12th Grade English

Students will read works of fiction and non-fiction, responding to these in class discussions, writing, and oral presentations. Students will also review the traits of effective writing. This will include, but not limited to, lessons in punctuation and grammar usage. Assignments regarding effective communication will be geared toward preparing the student for work- and real-life related situations.

 

Literature I

The core objective in this class is to improve student's writing by focusing on content, organization, sentence fluency, word choice, voice, grammar, and punctuation.  The primary focus of this semester will be on persuasive writing, speaking, and ultimately, debating.  Students will also read and test on several novels, using the Accelerated Reader program.  This content of the class material is geared toward the college-bound student. 

 

Literature II

The core objective of this class is to read and interpret literature with an analytical approach.  Students will be expected to discuss and write about the poems, short stories, and novels (classics) at a level that clearly conveys their understanding of more than just the literal interpretation, but the themes, symbols, conflicts, and relevance to society, as well.  Students will employ their knowledge of writing skills (covered in previous years) to clearly articulate their understanding of these works. 

 

Speech Competition

Students in this class will compete in at least one of nine specific events in competitive speaking:  entertainment, informative, persuasive, extemporaneous, poetry, humorous prose, serious prose, duet acting, and oral interpretation of drama.  The objective of this class is to boost students' confidence in public speaking situations by providing them with specific tips and instruction on how to be successful as a speaker.  The competition itself does involve traveling to area schools to compete in speech contests, which generally take place on Saturdays in late January, all through February, and into the first few weeks of March.

 

Journalism

Students will learn about journalistic-style writing (editorials, news, and feature-type stories), strive to improve their own writing and grammar skills, and have their work published in a school newspaper.   Other areas of study include the history of newspapers, media bias, plagiarism, journalistic ethics, careers in journalism, broadcast journalism, and photography.

 

Applied Technology

The focus of this class is to introduce students to some technological software, programs, and techniques that can benefit in them in some way, either in the classroom or in their personal life.  Students will learn about (but not limited to)… digital photography, advanced photo editing, movie-making and movie-editing, advanced PowerPoint skills, and web page design.  In addition, students will also explore the latest trends and innovations in technology (everything from the latest cell phones, to home theater, to biometrics).  The focus is to make the student aware of the constant changes and advances in technology and how these applications will affect, perhaps even benefit, them, as well expose students  to the  issues they must be aware of, such as fraud, identity theft, and other security breaches. 

 

Science

 

Life Science

 A 7th grade level class, this course will be an introduction into the world of living things.  All 6 kingdoms will be discussed, including Animals, Plants, Protists, Archaebacteria,  Eubacteria, and Fungi.  Students will learn the basics of many areas of Life Science including genetics, classification, populations in ecosystems, species variation, regulation and behavior, diversity and adaptations, and body systems and functions.  A focus will be aligning our learning with the NeSA Science Standards.

 

Earth Science

An 8th grade level class, this course will study the 4 main Earth Science areas, Meteorology, Oceanography, Space and Geology.  There will be in-depth studies of rocks and rock formations, plate tectonics, mountain types and formations, volcanoes, earthquakes, different types of minerals, soil and water studies.  An informative video series on NASA and its beginnings will be included in the study of space.  Weather will be monitored and studied from various geographical locations.  This class presents the students with an excellent overall background into Earth Science studies. New focus will be place with alignment of the Earth Science curriculum with the adopted NeSA Education Science Standards.

 

Physical Science

 

This is a required class for freshmen. It is an introductory science class that studies basic ideas of physics and chemistry. Students complete many laboratory studies and use math skills to solve problems. Topics covered include structure of the atom, properties and structure of matter, chemical reactions, motions and forces, energy and states of matter, energy in the solar system, and geochemical cycles. This course relates the physical aspects of science, how they are interrelated, and the cause and effect of human actions within the environment. Students need a calculator for this class.

 

Biology

 

A class for 10th grade students, Biology will build on the foundations of the 7th grade Life Science class.  Much more in-depth study will be done in the areas of genetics, evolution, invertebrate and vertebrate animals, ecosystems  and the environment, bacteria and viruses, protists, fungi,  and plants .  A rat dissection and dissecting of a sheep heart will enable the students to identify anatomical parts.  Focus will be placed on alignment with NeSA Science Standards

 

                                                                             General Science

 

General Science is a course designed for students who are not taking Chemistry, Physics, or Advanced Biology.  This would be their 3rd required Science course to meet graduation requirements. It is an overview of all the science areas with emphasis on human anatomy and physiology , systems of the universe, weather, structure of the earth, rock and water cycles, practical physical science, and energy and energy resources. The class lasts one academic year and fulfills the science requirements.  Emphasis is made on reviewing all areas of NeSA Science Standards.

Chemistry

 

Chemistry is a required class for junior students wishing to take four years of science in high school. Physical Science is a prerequisite. It is a laboratory and lecture based class that teaches the basics of chemistry to students. They should be able to move into college level chemistry after completing this course. Topics include measurement and chemical language, identification of elements and compounds, atomic theory, chemical reactions, states of matter, stoichiometrical calculations, reaction rates, and acid/base titrations. Students need math skills, and a calculator is required for this class. Emphasis is made on reviewing all areas of NeSa Science Standards.

 

Physics

 

Physics is an elective science course available to junior and seniors. Physical Science is a prerequisite. A basic understanding of trigonometry is helpful. This is a lecture and laboratory course. Students will be able to move into college physics after completing this course and calculus. Topics include mechanics of science, motion and forces, energy and thermodynamics, and waves and energy.

 

Advanced Biology

 

Advanced Biology is an elective science course for junior and senior students. Biology is a prerequisite. The class studies the anatomy and physiology of the 11 systems of the human body. It is very useful for students going into any field that involves the human body and is especially useful for students going into the medical profession. Students will learn the parts of the human body and their function. Dissection of a fetal pig is included for students to have an understanding of how the organ systems are closely related and how they are laid out inside the body.

 

Mathematics

Math 7

This course offers a wide survey of mathematical concepts, including numeration and number sense, computation and estimation, measurement,  geometry and spatial concepts, data analysis, probability, statistical concepts, and algebraic concepts.  The majority of class work will be done within the classroom with a combination of written material, hands-on activities, and online lessons. 

Pre-Algebra

Pre-Algebra will introduce many Algebra topics.  Students that pass the class will have a solid foundation for equation and inequality solving, operations on integers and rational numbers, graph linear equations, 2 and 3 dimensional figures, statistics and probability, and basic factoring of polynomials.

 

Algebra A

This course covers the algebraic concepts from the first half of the traditional Algebra I course at a slower pace.  Topics include:  properties of the number system, solving equations, linear functions, exponents, and radicals.  Work will be done primarily during class time with more repetition and life skills application.

 

Algebra B

This course is designed to follow Algebra A so that a student will have covered all the material of Algebra I with completion of the class.  Again, material will be covered at a slower pace with work being done mostly in class.  Topics covered are polynomials, quadratics, inequalities, systems of equations, and manipulation of rational and radical expressions. 

 

Algebra I

A preparatory course that places an emphasis on the systematic development of the language through which most of mathematics is communicated.  Topics covered are: properties of the number system, linear functions, inequalities, operations on real numbers and polynomials, exponents, radicals and quadratics. Successful completion of this sequence prepares students for Geometry.  A calculator is recommended for this class.  Recommendation: academic status from the 7th or 8th grade and a percentile score of 85% or better on the Orleans-Hanna Algebra Prognosis Test.

 

Geometry

A survey of the fundamental and advanced concepts of plane geometry and related topics in three-dimensional geometry, coordinate geometry and transformational geometry. The course begins with necessary introductory vocabulary and continues with algebraic and geometric proofs based on an axiomatic system.  Algebra is utilized extensively in this course. Successful completion of this course prepares a student for further work in Algebra II.  A calculator is recommended for this class.  Recommendation: Algebra I with a grade of 77% or better.

 

Math Concepts

This course is designed to follow Algebra A and B with a wide survey of mathematical concepts, including numeration and number sense, computation and estimation, measurement,  geometry and spatial concepts, data analysis, probability, statistical concepts, and algebraic concepts.  The majority of class work will be done within the classroom with a combination of written material, hands-on activities, and online lessons.  A calculator is recommended for this class. 

 

Algebra II

Algebra II will be designed to prepare students for Calculus.  Algebra II continues practice with area and volume problems and introduces more abstract concepts, such as; system of equations, complex fractions, abstract algebra, trigonometry functions, imaginary number system, polar coordinates, and many word problems. .  A student that is in Algebra II must be highly motivated and one that attends school.  Recommendation: Geometry with a grade of 77%.

 

Statistics

Students will have the opportunity to take this class after completing Algebra II.  They can take this class for college credits if they chose to, but that is not required.  This is a constructivist approach for introductory statistics.  Rather than describing and explaining statistics through exposition alone, Workshop Statistics offered activities designed to lead students to discover statistical  concepts, explore statistical principles, and apply statistical techniques.

 

Advanced Mathematics

 

A survey of the topics essential for success in Calculus.  Content includes a study of complex numbers, right triangle trigonometry, and conic sections; algebraic, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, as well as their composition and inverses; and the topic of matrices.  A graphing calculator (TI-83/TI-84) is recommended for this class.  Recommendation: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II with grades of 85%.

 

Calculus

Course content includes the study of limits; derivatives; integration; applications; exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions and their inverses.  A graphing calculator (TI-83/TI-84) is recommended for this class.  Recommendation: Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II and Advanced Math with grades of 85%.

 

Social Sciences

Ancient World History  (7th SS)

Students will study the origins and development of ancient societies of major western and non-western civilizations. Included are the societies of the Near East, Africa, the ancient Hebrew civilization, Greece, Rome, and the classical civilizations of India and China. For each of these societies, emphasis is placed on the major contributions, achievements, and beliefs that have influenced civilizations across the centuries to the present day.

 

The course content focuses on the people in ancient societies; their problems and accomplishments; their social, economic, political structures, and belief systems; the tools and technology they developed; the arts they created; the architecture; the literature they produced; their explanation for natural phenomena, and their direct or indirect contributions to issues such as the role of women and the practice of slavery

World Geography (8th SS)

Students we will look at Geography as a study of places on the earth’s surface.  We will understand how places are different and have changed over time.  This class will help students gain a global perspective and better understanding of the relationship among people, places and surrounding environment on earth.

American History I

Usually taken sophomore year, this class covers the first part of American history going as far back as the first Americans with the Paleo-Indians 40,0000 years ago, ending with the progressive movement at the turn of the 19th century. We begin with the lives of the first Americans to populate North America and their development of farming and early cultures. We then narrow our focus with the arrival of Europeans including Columbus and the early colonies and the effects and consequences of colonization. We then move on to the development of the early colonies, the fight for independence, and the development and growth of the United States. We elaborate on early hardships including the war of 1812, the Mexican American War, the Civil War, and Reconstruction. We also discuss the development of our early economy and how it progressed during the Industrial Revolution. Finally, we end or course as the United States enters the 20th century with the progressive movement.       

World Geography

 As students we will look at Geography as a study of places on the earth’s surface.  We will understand how places are different and have changed over time.  This class will help students gain a global perspective and better understanding of the relationship among people, places and surrounding environment on earth.

American History II

Usually taken Junior year, this class begins at the turn of the 19th century with the McKinley and Teddy Roosevelt administrations and ending with the present. We begin with American imperialism and discussion of our increasing role in world affairs as the United States became a world power. We discuss the United States’ participation in the Spanish American War, the building of the Panama Canal, the voyage of the Great Fleet, and U.S. participation during the Great War to show our growing influence in the world. We examine the economic boom of the 1920’s and how it lead into the turmoil and hardships of the Great Depression. We analyze the world economic situation that led to the rise of totalitarian government and we go into great depth on how the United States answered the call to help make the world safe for democracy in World War II. After the surrender of the Axis Powers in 1945, we discuss the Cold War and its effect on U.S. foreign and domestic policy, the advancement of human rights with the Civil Rights Movement, and the discontent and turmoil of Vietnam and the 1960’s. Finally, we cover the development of the U.S. economy over the last 50 years and our place in a global economy, our development into a super power and our role in foreign affairs, and the new challenges we face including terrorism and global competition. 

World History

This is semester course usually taken junior year. In this class we trace the development of civilization from the Paleolithic era to the Age of Industrialization. They learn about the first hominids, the development of farming and culture, and the rise of the first civilizations. We learn about Greek and Roman culture and its effect on modern learning. We also discuss the middle ages and the development of the feudal system. Next we discuss the Renaissance and the rebirth of learning and exploration. Through these time periods, we also discuss the development of religion and the rise of the Christianity, Islam. And Judaism.  By examining and studying the development and world civilizations and major events in history, students gain a better understanding of the world they live in and deeper perspectives on current events and world affairs. 

Current Issues

This is an elective semester course, which can be taken by any student, but usually reserved for juniors or seniors.  In this class we will take a historical and contemporary look at issues in international politics, U.S. foreign relations, U.S. domestic policy, and the global economy.  This course provides students an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the issues that frequent newspapers, television news, and other popular media and fuel the controversies that both divide our population here in the United States and around the globe. The course will be flexible in nature to accommodate significant current events, but the general direction of the class will be to study how the major current issues including gun violence, human rights, drug abuse, political campaigns, crime, and other major controversial topics are covered in the media and the effect they have on our society.

 

 Psychology – 300 Level

 

Psychology is the study of individual human behavior and provides an opportunity to develop an understanding of psychology as a field of scientific study and inquiry. The course covers psychological research methods, major theories of development, and underlying issues of abnormal behavior.  The course traces the development of psychological theory and practice. Students will examine their own behavior and development in relation to the major concepts.  Students will develop an understanding of how the knowledge and methods of psychologists are applied to the solution of human problems. Content for the course includes insights into behavior patterns and adjustments to social environments. Psychology will allow students to develop critical attitudes toward generalizations about human beings and a heightened sensitivity to the feelings and needs of others. Students will develop effective reading, writing, research, discussion, and thinking skills.  

 

 Sociology – 300 Level

 

Sociology provides opportunities for students to study society and group behavior as well as basic human institutions. Students will develop an awareness of the effect their group and culture has on them as well as others.  Broad areas of content include the study of institutions found in all societies and could involve:

  1. the family
  2. religion
  3. community organizations
  4. political and social groups
  5. leisure time organizations
  6. social problems and the effects of problems on the institutions

Moral values, traditions, folkways, the mobility of people and other factors in society, which may influence a group, will also be explored. Students will develop effective reading, writing, research, discussion, and thinking skills.

                                           Economics

The general objective of a high school economics course is for students to master fundamental economic concepts, appreciate how the principal concepts of economics relate to each other and understand the structure of economic systems. Students will use economic concepts in a reasoned, careful manner in dealing with personal, community, national and global economic issues. Students will learn to make reasoned decisions on economics.

 

World History – 300 Level

This is semester course usually taken junior year. In this class we trace the development of civilization from the Paleolithic era to the Age of Industrialization. They learn about the first hominids, the development of farming and culture, and the rise of the first civilizations. We learn about Greek and Roman culture and its effect on modern learning. We also discuss the middle ages and the development of the feudal system. Next we discuss the Renaissance and the rebirth of learning and exploration. Through these time periods, we also discuss the development of religion and the rise of the Christianity, Islam. And Judaism.  By examining and studying the development and world civilizations and major events in history, students gain a better understanding of the world they live in and deeper perspectives on current events and world affairs. 

 

American Government – 400 Level

 

In this course, students apply knowledge gained in previous years of study to pursue a deeper understanding of the institutions of American Government. In addition, they draw on their studies of world and American history and geography and other societies to compare differences and similarities in world governmental systems today. This course is the culmination of history/social sciences classes to prepare students to solve society1s problems, to understand and to participate in the governmental process, and to be a responsible citizen of the United States and the world

 

Agricultural Department

Agri-science

This class is geared toward but not limited to the freshman who thinks that they might like to be involved in high school agriculture, and/or FFA as well as possibly choosing a career in agriculture. Students will study the history of agriculture and the FFA, a number of different Agri-sciences including plant science, animal science, natural resources, horticulture, and basic scientific principles. Students will also spend time learning and developing speaking skills, sales skills, parliamentary procedure and other meeting, & design skills. CASE curriculum will be used for the science-based topics. Students need to be enrolled in Ag Business as well.

 

AG Business

This class is a continuation of our Agri-science curriculum and is based in the student use of the State approved record keeping system for FFA.  Material will include proper entry and use of Data entered into the record keeping system and the completion of Applications for FFA in conjunction with their development of their SAE program. Students must be enrolled in both Agri-science and Ag Business

 

Animal Biology

Students in this class will first review basic scientific principles. Students will study livestock and breed selection, as well as anatomy and physiology of the Beef animal, spending particular attention to the 9 major body systems, and how they all affect production. Students will spend time examining organs from each system to better understand the purpose of that system, as well as it how it does what it does.

 

Large Animal Management

Students in this class will study the management of species to include beef, dairy beef, swine, sheep, horse, and poultry.  Students will be exposed to feed rations, feed stuffs, vaccination techniques, sterilization and identification methods, as well as new and emerging practices such as artificial insemination, and embryo transfer. Students will be given opportunities to apply this knowledge to things that they might do every day, like buying or eating different cuts of meat, to selecting healthy and high quality animals.

Horticulture

Students will study the parts of a plant, practice basic green house management, explore the field of hydroponics, practice plant care and propagation techniques, including germination, and divisions. Students will also learn basic landscaping principles, and practices, practice landscaping techniques, study Integrated past management systems and explore which systems work best in different situations and develop floral design skills. In addition students will be growing a marketable crop in the school green house and preparing that crop for sale. Students need to be enrolled in both horticulture and plant science.

Plant Science

Students will learn to identify plant species, both for indoor and out dour use, continue to practice the principles of green house management, explore the field of hydroponics, practice plant care and propagation techniques, including germination, soft and hard wood cuttings, divisions, and possibly grafting. Students will also learn basic landscaping principles, and practices, practice landscaping techniques, study Integrated past management systems and explore which systems work best in different situations and develop floral design skills. Students will be growing a marketable crop in the school green house and preparing that crop for sale. Students need to be enrolled in both horticulture and plant science

 

Natural Resources

Students will study resource management, that will include air quality, water & soil conservation and quality testing, energy resource management and conservation, and wildlife management.  The history of wildlife management and the intelligent use of our worlds recourses will be a main focus of the class. Focusing on habitat needs and development, as is needed for different species of wildlife found in Nebraska.

 

Advanced Natural resources

Students will spend time studying the wildlife species of our country, paying particular attention to endangered species as well as practices that are being used to help increase or control populations of a species in a given habitat.

Ag Business

Students will study different types of agricultural businesses, practice giving business/sales presentations, gain experience in the practice of completing applications, and preparing for an interview, study marketing strategies utilized in today's agriculture, and help set up a class business that they would run.  Students will be expected to keep personal record books, as well as class project records.

Ag Records

Students will be expected to attend scheduled class meeting dates, on scheduled days, or make prior arrangements with the instructor,  Class attendance will be graded.  Students will also be graded on record book completeness, and how up to date it is, at the end of each month.  Students will be expected to build a resume, and complete a Proficiency application that will be submitted to the district proficiency review.  Seniors will also be expected to complete the State degree form, as well as the FFA Scholarship application, if in FFA, or another scholarship application that the student would be eligible to receive.

Ag Sales and Entrepreneurship

Students will study different types of agricultural businesses, practice giving business/sales presentations, gain experience in the practice of completing applications, and preparing for an interview, and study marketing strategies utilized in today's agriculture, The majority of the class curriculum will be based around the set up and operation of a class business, utilizing the Plasma cutting and welding equipment that is available.  Students will be expected to keep personal record books, as well as class project records. All students should have taken Agri-science / Ag business previously and welding experience is preferred. Preference should be given to seniors and juniors, and enrollment will be capped based on the number of usable computers that are available.

Welding

Students will learn how to weld mild steel in several types of joints, and thickness in the flat position.  Students use arc, MIG, acetylene welders and Torch and plasma cutter for cutting metal.  Students should enroll in Metal fabrication as well, to get the full curriculum

Metal Fabrication

Students will learn how to weld mild steel in several types of joints, and thickness, out of position.  Students use arc, MIG, acetylene welders and Torch and plasma cutter for cutting metal.  After developing skills with all machines, they construct an approved project. Students purchase materials used in the project. Students must complete and pass welding to continue on in Metal Fabrication.

Advanced Welding

Students will learn advance-welding techniques that may include work with TIG welding as well as flux core welding if equipment becomes available.  Students will be instrumental in helping and modeling welding techniques for beginner welders, and will have an opportunity to learn and utilize the CNC plasma equipment to design and create projects.  The majority of the class will be used to allow students to create more advanced welding and cutting projects.  Students must have completed and exceled in both welding and metal fabrication, they must exhibit self-motivating characteristics, and enrollment in course will be at the discretion and approval of the instructor. Enrollment will be limited to juniors and seniors.

Art

7th Grade Art

This class introduces a variety of art forms and media such as drawing, ceramics, sculpture, lettering, graphic design, and popular crafts as well as an introduction to art appreciation.

 

8th Grade Art

This class enhances and refines skills learned in 7th grade which includes art forms, media, drawing, ceramics sculpture, lettering, graphic design, and popular crafts.  Each student will be encouraged to develop his/her own personal style based on traditional methods developed in this class.

 

Art 1

A basic foundation course designed to build the student's confidence in using a variety of art media, to encourage the student's creativity, and to increase the student's awareness of art around them and in world cultures. The elements and principles of design will be stressed in all techniques and media explored and in the study of visual arts.

 

Art 2

The student will continue to develop technical skills and an understanding of why artists create. Emphasis will be placed on student involvement in making choices and expressing ideas. Through studying visual arts heritage, the student will learn about art and how it affects their world.

 

Art 3

The student will be assisted in strengthening personal style and increasing competency in media areas of interest. Visual arts heritage emphasis will be placed on contemporary art and art careers.  A student who is applying for scholarships or to college art programs will be given assistance in preparing portfolios.

 

Art 4

The student will continue to explore in greater depth the aspects and relationships of both the commercial and studio artist. The student should have prior skills, competencies, and be responsible for selecting several areas in which to problem solve with the teacher serving as the facilitator. A student who is applying for scholarships or to college art programs will be given assistance in preparing portfolios.

Band

Junior High Band

Instrumental music is offered for grades 7-8. Class emphasis focuses on the refinement of skills necessary for long term student success with their individual instrument, specifically tone quality, technique, aural skills, and music literacy. Students will have the opportunity to transition to a more mature instrument in this course if desired. Students will be expected to play and enhance performance skills on marching band, pep band, and concert band music.

 

High School Band

Instrumental music is offered for grades 9-12. Class emphasis is on the advancement of the instrument technique, the further development of the ensemble performance skills, and rehearsal and performance of many styles of music including marching band, pep band, and concert band music. The instrumental ensemble will not only enable students to perform selected literature on their specific instrument, but will also give a general understanding of music as a performer, listener, and intelligent consumer of the art.

Business

Accounting I

 

Accounting I provides an understanding of the basic principles of the double-entry accounting system.  Students will study the accounting cycle for a sole proprietorship, and a partnership.  Some activities in the course include recording transactions, preparing worksheets, financial statements, and payroll.

Accounting II

Prerequisite:  Accounting I.  This course included partnership and corporate accounting, adjustments in inventory control systems, budgetary control systems and further enhancement of accounting skills.

 

 Information Technology

This course is designed to emphasize digital citizenship, basic computer operations, word processing applications, spreadsheet applications, presentation applications, and technology communication tools.  Students will master keyboarding skills; compose, create, edit, and format word processing documents; organize and manipulate data in a spreadsheet; and prepare a format presentations.

 

 Advanced Computers

 

This class continues to reinforce and strengthen the student's computer skills.  It will
focus on the advanced techniques and skills being required in today's society.   Software programs covered include, Microsoft Word, Access, Excel, PowerPoint, Microsoft Publisher, Photoshop Elements and Movie Maker.  Digital cameras, digital movie cameras and scanners will also be used in this.  This course is designed for students interested in furthering their computer skills for use in their pursuit of future goals.   Good typing skills are required.

 

Digital Media

 

The students will learn all about the tools and techniques of the Adobe program, Photoshop, as well as the basics of graphic design (fonts, color schemes, arrangements, etc.)  in order to create original art work, design personalized gifts, and edit photographs.

Digital Design

 

Students will explore the advanced concepts of graphic design, and expand their knowledge of the Adobe software programs like Photoshop and Illustrator.  Students will create a portfolio of their projects, either for display or for admission into college programs in digital design.

 

Business Law

 

Business Law is designed to help students develop an appreciation for the law and a practical understanding of how the legal framework within which individuals function—personal, social, and business.  Business law affects each of us on a daily basis, whether we are buying a car, taking clothes to the dry cleaners, obtaining a job, or applying for credit.  This class provides a general understanding of how law affects us as citizens, workers, and consumers.

General Business

 

General Business emphasizes personal management and prepares students to understand their needs, wants, goals and resources that enable them to make rational decisions that contribute to quality of life. Topics included are: budgeting, credit, savings, investments, taxes, consumer buying, consumer rights and responsibilities, careers, job applications, interviews, and resumes.

Personal Finance

This course is designed to assist students in personal financial management skills.  Students learn to manage their resources and to make sound personal financial decisions.  Units of study include budgeting, insurance, saving and investing, home ownership, banking, taxes, credit, wills and estates.

 

Business Communications

This course introduces you to the fundamental principles of business communication and gives you the opportunity to develop your communication skills.  You will gain valuable insights into ethics, etiquette, listening, teamwork, and nonverbal communications.

Choir

Junior High Choir

Vocal music is offered for grades 7-8. Class emphasis focuses on the refinement of proper vocal techniques, musical expression, aural skills, and music literacy. Students will be expected to play and enhance performance skills on standard choral works and pop music.

 

Family Consumer Science

 7th Grade

Students will have the opportunity to explore family and consumer sciences areas of personal development, leadership, communication, relationships, foods and nutrition.  This is a hands-on course filled with project based unit assessments.  Students will find themselves busy learning about family and themselves while setting goals and enhancing their leadership, communication and conflict resolution skills. Students will also have the opportunity to evaluate their own nutritional needs and learn how to prepare nutritious foods/meals safely.

 8th Grade

Students will have the opportunity to explore family and consumer sciences areas of relationships, housing design, foods and nutrition, clothing construction, and consumerism.  This is a hands-on course filled with project based unit assessments.  Students will find themselves busy designing a room, preparing nutritious meals, sewing a project, and along with completing a consumerism project.

Basic Living – 100 Level

 

This is an introductory course, which gives students an overview of family and consumer sciences.  It allows students to explore all areas of family and consumer sciences while empowering them with basic living skills.  The students will explore and learn about themselves and their families, childcare, consumerism, food and nutrition, clothing/textiles/fashion, and housing and living space.  Students will complete major projects in each area with a variety of learning experiences beforehand. This course is strongly recommended if planning to take additional family and consumer sciences courses as it provides an excellent background of information. The class is designed for the freshman/sophomore student.

 

Advanced Child Development – 200 Level

This course focuses on preparing for parenthood.  Decision making involved with becoming parents is first discussed along with parenting decisions and practices.  The main focus of the class begins with reproduction, pregnancy, and prenatal care and the care and development of an infant.  Simulated parenting and pregnancy experiences by wearing the Empathy Belly and carrying the Baby Think It Over Doll will lead to further understanding and appreciation of the responsibilities involved with parenthood.  Additionally, the class travels to a hospital to tour the delivery and neonatal units at Faith Regional Hospital.  The last half of the course focuses on the physical, emotional, social, intellectual, and moral development of children from the ages of 1-6.  Discipline of children is also included.  Special projects include running a preschool in the classroom, presenting lesson to pre-school students, and teaching lower elementary students.  Students will be observing and working with children through the entire course.  This class is recommended for students in grades 10-12.

 

Advanced Foods – 200 Level

This course teaches students about nutrition and food preparation.  The principles of food preparation will be examined and demonstrated at the beginning of the course along with individual student diet analysis.  Application of food preparation principles will begin in the middle of the course.  Food science experiments will be performed throughout the course.  Students will also be involved with a menu planning project, appliance demonstrations, and a recipe file box project.   Food labs will cover:  fats, eggs, quick breads, yeast breads, beef, pork, poultry, seafood, and ethnic food.  This class is recommended for students in grades 10-12.

 

Housing Design – 200 Level

Students will understand their housing needs and learn to make decisions about their future homes.  Students will study housing needs and selection, housing and architectural styles, furniture styles, design elements/principles, and interior design.   Students will also interpret floor plans and blueprints and study traffic patterns, furniture placement, and arrangement, location and size of rooms in a home.  Furniture selection and landscaping will also be covered.  Plans include tours and information from various home manufacturers, landscapers, interior designers, local homes, and furniture and appliance stores.  Students will be designing various floor plans, creating sample boards, and may gain hands on experience with interior design. This class is recommended for students in grades 10-12.

 

Fashion Design – 200 Level

During this course students will learn what influences a person’s clothing choices and the effect clothing has on first impressions. By completing a color analysis and Ideal Silhouette/Suit Yourself software, students will learn how to select the correct colors, styles, and fabrics, for the individual student.  Students will also learn advanced construction techniques in order to evaluate a ready to wear garment.  Design and construction of a garment will be performed at the end of the term.  This class is recommended for students in grades 10-12.

 

Adult Living – 300 Level

This is a semester course designed around significant concerns which people face as they enter adulthood. In the first half of the semester, emphasis is placed on self-discovery and learning about relationships.  During the second half of the semester, the focus changes to consumer skills.  Students will complete two simulations: one in the first half with a partner in planning the life of a “family” and the other in the second half which is done individually to set up and manage a household budget while organizing and running a business.  This course is strongly recommended for all seniors as it is a junior/senior level class.

Foreign Language

Exploratory Spanish 7

The purpose of 7th Grade Exploratory Spanish is to begin building vocabulary of basic terminology of Spanish including alphabet, numbers, introductions, time, date, and weather.  Students will give a presentation in Spanish to the class.  Students will begin to develop fluency and confidence through storytelling (TPRS).

 

Exploratory Spanish 8

Exploratory Spanish 8th Grade will review and build upon the vocabulary introduced in 7th grade and begin to talk about a few introductory grammar concepts in brief to expand their understanding of the language.  Vocabulary added will include classroom items, family member, activities and likes or dislikes.  Students will create and present in Spanish about family members.

Español I

Spanish I students will develop basic proficiency in speaking, reading, writing, and listening in the present tense.  Students will compare and contrast cultural components including art, food, and historical people and events.  Emphasis will be placed on building vocabulary, pronunciation, and basic grammatical structures.

Español II

Spanish II students will continue to build proficiency in speaking, reading, writing and listening in the present tense and past tenses. Students will continue to examine cultural component of various Spanish-speaking countries.  Students will read and Level two novel with the purpose of building fluency and conversational proficiency.

Español III

Spanish III students will examine more complex grammatical structures including a review of present tenses, preterit tense, and imperfect tenses.  Students will complete a Level 3 novel, which will build fluency and allow a more extensive examination of a specific culture.  Students will build their literacy through continued speaking, reading, writing, and listening.

 

Español IV

Spanish III students will examine more complex grammatical structures including a review of present tenses, preterit tense, imperfect tenses, and subjunctive tenses.  Students will complete a novel, which will build fluency and allow a more extensive examination of a specific culture.  Students will build their literacy through continued speaking, reading, writing, and listening.

 

Industrial Technology

JH Exploratory

This course offers opportunities to students to explore the different areas of Industrial Technology.  The students will be introduced to drafting, wood working, building construction and technology.  The students will be introduced to basic skills in measurement, tool safety, computer processes, social skills and be able to work with others.  Problem solving and critical thinking strategies are discussed and used thoroughly throughout the class. 

Small Engines

Learn parts and working systems of a small gas engine.  Hands on tearing down and reassembling of engine with it starting and running when completed. Become familiar with automotive wiring systems, transmissions, hydraulic and pneumatic systems, and automotive design.  Students will do hands on projects in each area with actual assembly or construction of projects to familiarize student with actual operation of each area.

CAD I

 

These courses are designed to develop beginning/advanced skills in architectural/mechanical drafting.  Students will learn about various materials and processes used in building construction by creating sketches and presentation quality drawings using pencil, paper, and computer-aided software.  Students will participate in hands-on activity-based projects.  Problem solving, critical thinking, and self-motivating skills are emphasized. 

CAD II

 

This course is designed to develop beginning/advanced skills in architectural drafting.  Students will learn about various materials and processes used in the building construction area by creating sketches and presentation quality drawings using pencil, paper and computer aided software.  Students will participate in hands-on activity based projects.  Problem solving, critical thinking, and self-motivating skills are emphasized.

Building Construction

 

This course offers opportunities to students in the construction business.  Students will develop fundamental math skills as they apply it to the carpentry, plumbing, and electrical industries.  Foundation, framing, and roofing skills and strategies will be the focus of the class.  Home repairs, plumbing, and electricity are also topics covered in the class.  Woods I or Woods II is a prerequisite to taking this course.

Principles of Technology

 

This course offers the study for the main manufacturing processes. It will illustrate how a design is turned into a product. It will offer a detailed understanding of manufacturing processes used in industry such as casting, molding, forming, cutting, and welding and will relate the design requirements of a part to the possible manufacturing processes. The course also includes quality assurance of manufactured parts by inspection and testing. It will also discuss how the material properties of a product control the spectrum of manufacturing processes that can be utilized and will highlight major design guidelines for each manufacturing process to be successful.

Woods I

 

This course offers opportunities to students in the cabinetmaking industry.  These courses will introduce tool safety, plan reading, beginner woodworking techniques and advanced techniques.  Planning and problem solving are key components in this course.

Woods II

 

This course is offered for the advanced student interested in learning lifelong skills in the area of construction and manufacturing.  The student will have a variety of areas of study to select from including cabinet making, carpentry and other advanced areas. During this course students will continue to build on their knowledge in planning a project, selection and use materials, including tools and machines to produce a finished product.  Emphasis will be on safety and quality of workmanship. This class is about the world of work and each student will need to be in attendance and participate fully in all activities.

Physical Education

 

Junior High Physical Education

Students that are not participating in junior high sports will enroll in physical education. This course is designed to demonstrate education of sports, muscular strength, and cardiovascular fitness. Students will begin an understanding of movement, concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply in the learning and performance of physical activities.

Physical Education and Health 1

 

This course is designed for 9th grade physical education and health. It demonstrates understanding of movement, concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply to the learning and performance of physical activities.  This includes and consists of education of sports and cardiovascular fitness. On the health side, this course specifically assists students with nutrition and reducing risk factors and steps of refusal for substance abuse, which will enable students to develop responsible behavior, positive self-esteem and respect for others.

Physical Education II and Health

 

This course is designed for 10-12th grade physical education and health students that did not get physical education I/Health as a 9th grader.  It demonstrates understanding of movement, concepts, principles, strategies, and tactics as they apply t the learning and performance of physical activities.  This includes and consists of education of sports, cardiovascular fitness and weight lifting to include proper technique, goal set-up for students’ improvement.  On the health side, this course specifically assists students with nutrition and reducing risk factors and steps of refusal for substance abuse, which will enable students to develop responsible behavior, positive self-esteem and respect for others.

Weightlifting

 

This course is designed for 11-12th grade physical education students.   The weightlifting class was designed to provide each student with the basic knowledge needed to understand the importance of strength and fitness training.  Students will understand the importance of setting goals for personal improvement and achievement, and will leave the class with a lifelong understanding of how to maintain adequate physical fitness for a healthy lifestyle

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